Lightbulbs hanging from ceiling

I’ll level with you: “Levels of Work” tips and traps

By Sam Robinson

A useful model that supports people to work well together in an organisation is the concept of “Levels of Work”. Familiar to many, it’s also one of the toughest things to grasp for people new to organisational theory (for an explanation, see the Systems Leadership: Creating Positive Organisations book).

Essentially, Levels of Work proposes that work differs in complexity in organisations and the predominance of a certain level of complexity determines the Level of Work. (When work tasks are grouped together, this is called a “role”.) By complexity, I’m talking about the range and degree of ambiguity in variables having an impact on decision-making.

If you’ve ever worked at different levels in a large organisation, there are plenty of examples you’ll be familiar with. The first entry-level job you had when you came into an organisation is likely to have had fewer variables and a shorter impact horizon for your decisions than your later, more senior roles. For example, someone working in a team on a construction site laying the foundations for a new building is performing different work to someone leading a construction crew and being concerned with things like materials being ordered on time, the well-being and productivity of individuals, and the whole project moving forward as it should.

Levels of Work, once understood for the first time, is a real light bulb moment. Helping to shine a light on the actual value that an individual role should add to an organisation often entails reflection that opens a whole new world of understanding about work. For me, it helped me to understand my frustration with managers I’ve had in the past who dipped down and tried to work at “my” level.

But be careful.

From a bird's eye view, a computer monitor and scattered paper, phone, and writing implements. Forearms are shown, with the right hand holding a pink highlighter.

A Fresh Approach to Business Planning for the Next Financial Year

By Peter White

Thinking about how your business planning has gone for this financial year?

Does this sound familiar then?

Here we go again!

Looks like I’m going to have to turn myself inside out again to produce a business plan for next year!

Why does it have to be so complex? No one really reads it after it’s been approved anyway.

I’d better get the one I did last year out of my bottom drawer to see if we achieved any of the “stuff” that we said we were going to do last year.

Oh dear, looks we didn’t do all the “stuff” we said we were going to do, but we did do a lot of other great “stuff’’!

Oh! It looks like we didn’t deliver on our promises. Hope we can do better next year.

Best get started on the plan. Hmm, now where is that business planning template?

Do you get frustrated by the business planning process? Do you feel it is a waste of time? Do you feel like you are doing lots of “stuff, ” but not turning your intention into reality? Do you find it hard to keep track of all the things that you committed to in the plan?

Well, if you’re thinking of using the same old process and expecting better results this time around, you are taking an unnecessary risk.

When I talk to clients, I say business planning doesn’t have to be complicated in the extreme. Part of the challenge is setting off from a sensible platform. For this, we have the Plan-Do-Check-Adjust process, which in my view is “Agile” thinking at its best. Here’s how I approach the planning process.