John Cawley

Council Transition Support Expert Interview: John Cawley, structural design and change management expert

LKS Quaero is offering a complete package of Council Transition Support for amalgamating NSW Councils. This is part of a series of interviews in which our transition expert team members pass on some key nuggets of advice.

John Cawley is a change management and structural design expert, with expertise in organisational and business function system design. A qualified and highly experienced mechanical engineer and manager, John has led a distinguished career as senior executive in vocational education and in private industry. He is a proven project manager across complex projects and an experienced Lean practitioner and facilitator. John is a former General Manager of a major supply organisation to the automotive and appliance industry sectors, with extensive experience in highly technical robotic automation manufacturing facilities. He has international presentation experience in new and emerging technology, green technologies, and logistics. Here is his structural design and change management advice for leaders of amalgamating NSW Councils.

What are the key systems design and change management challenges in an amalgamation?

The key change management challenge is to establish a cultural fit. Some years ago, when a manufacturing conglomerate I worked for acquired a group of companies, it took ten years to wind out the old culture and wind in the acceptance of the new culture. In order to successfully establish a new Council, you have to properly establish a new culture much faster than that. What that means is drilling down into knowing people: what are their values? Establishing the mission and values is really important: the mission establishes the boundaries around what you can and can’t do and the values determine who you are. Strategic planning is really the starting point for determining the strategic and cultural fit.

The key challenge of designing a system is to separate out the system and the process. Once you have your strategic plan, you need to link it in with the operational plan. Underpinning that are your systems and processes. Identify what systems you currently have and determine if you have the right ones to achieve your operational plan, the right processes to enable it, and the right people to drive it through. Those are the three crucial things: systems, processes, and people.

Council Transition Support Expert Interview: Geoff Haberfeld, finance, governance, and risk specialist

LKS Quaero is offering a complete package of Council Transition Support for amalgamating NSW Councils. This is part of a series of interviews in which our transition expert team members pass on some key nuggets of advice.

Geoff Haberfeld consults in finance, governance, and risk. A former senior executive in Commonwealth and State Government business enterprises and policy agencies, he has a good understanding of the “workings of government,” including budget processes, funding arrangements, and regulatory regimes.

Well experienced in organisational reform, Geoff has held senior roles in a variety of organisations during times of significant change. His experience ranges across local, state, and federal government, including water, health, and housing. Geoff is also Deputy Chair of the Cairns Regional Council Audit Committee and Chair of the Douglas Shire Council Audit Committee. Here is his advice for leaders of amalgamating Councils in NSW.

What are the characteristics of a successful amalgamation process?

A successful amalgamation will be characterised by a united and sustainable organisation sharing common goals and aspirations, achieved by a well thought out transition process and strong stakeholder engagement.

Early attention should be given to:

  • Appointing a transition team representing all stakeholders, meeting regularly and supported by a good practice risk based project management framework
  • Commencing a communication program involving all staff regularly, utilising face to face, email, and social media
  • Developing a new organisation structure and communicating it to all staff
  • Developing an ICT Strategy encompassing the IT infrastructure, business and technical applications, and communications applications, including customer interfaces
  • Developing position papers for addressing key factors having an impact upon long term financial sustainability, including a common rating system and common service levels
  • Commencing a financial due diligence review
Image of Nick Tobin

Council Transition Support Expert Interview: Nick Tobin, former General Manager and strategy/financial sustainability expert

LKS Quaero is offering a complete package of Council Transition Support for amalgamating NSW Councils. This is part of a series of interviews in which our transition expert team members pass on some key nuggets of advice.

Nick Tobin is an innovative and experienced General Manager with a depth of experience in senior positions in local government, excelling across property development, efficient service delivery, financial management, and stakeholder management. Nick led the delivery of one of the largest pieces of public infrastructure delivered and funded by local government: The Concourse, Chatswood’s entertainment and performing arts precinct. The unique funding model and project plan developed for the site by Nick and his team has become a leading model across local government. During Nick’s period as General Manager at Willoughby City Council, the City was awarded the A R Bluett Memorial Award, the highest accolade available to local government. Here is his advice for General Managers and CFOs of amalgamating Councils in NSW.

What are the key management challenges in upcoming amalgamations in NSW?

The biggest challenge will be putting aside previous beliefs as many GMs were clearly against amalgamations. There have been some perceived winners and losers in the process and bridges need to be built to create an inclusive environment. Interim GMs will also need to work very closely with the Administrators and the implementation committees of former elected members.

Another challenge will be keeping the public informed on what is and isn’t changing. Getting the public onside will be essential if the amalgamation is to be successful. Elections will be held in September 2017, so major changes will be difficult to implement prior to then, but there is an opportunity to develop a new Community Strategic Plan, which will be the blueprint for the new Council. It is unlikely that major asset sales and acquisitions will occur before the new Council is appointed, but an asset strategy should be developed, to be adopted by the new Council and integrated into the Long Term Financial Plan.

Image of Susan Law

Council Transition Support Expert Interview: Susan Law, former local government CEO and strategy expert

LKS Quaero is offering a complete package of Council Transition Support for amalgamating NSW Councils. This is the first in a series of interviews in which our transition expert team members pass on some key nuggets of advice.

Susan Law has led and managed public sector organisations, including local government, health, and housing organisations, in New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and the UK. Now an escapee from the Council chamber, she is using her vast experience in complex organisational management, strategic planning, and organisational transformation, particularly during periods of change, to support public sector organisations to position themselves to meet future challenges.

As a former CEO, Susan has completed the amalgamation of three Councils, from forging a new culture to reviewing and reshaping services to enable consistency of delivery and equalisation of costs and revenues. Here is her advice for General Managers of amalgamating Councils in NSW.

From your past experience as a CEO of amalgamating Councils, what are the key challenges in upcoming amalgamations in NSW?

Once the new elected members are established, it is important to align members’ aspirations for the transition with what needs to be done. Sometimes, the Council members are accepting amalgamation only because they have to. There is a need to focus the Council on the future, helping them to understand how their aspirations for the community might be able to be met.

For those elected members who will be in an advisory role during this time, it is important to help them to understand that they have a valuable role in providing support and direction in an organisation that is in transition. Whether they have a part in the new Council or not, they have a critical role to play in ensuring their organisation and community are best represented and that means paying as much attention to the transition issues as they paid to business as usual in the past.

The same applies to the employees. The leadership has to be motivated and inspired, so it is very important to be able to paint a picture of the new Council that is not just two or more bits of old organisations bolted together. Nobody gets out of bed to come to work just to save money, so pictures of working for a successful integrated community have to be painted. It is crucial to communicate that the efficiencies gained are not gained for their own sake, but to enable the Council to build the infrastructure and provide the services that the communities need, now and into the next generation. Councils are in the long term game and it is exciting to be able to play a part at a critical stage.

The last key challenge is running an ambidextrous organisation. That is, the challenge is keeping the business as usual going and sunsetting the old organisation, all while overseeing its refulgence as the new organisation.

A figure leaps off a mountainous landscape into a bright sky

The CEO of 2025: the Anti CEO?

By Susan Law

As local government internationally is undergoing change (from review to transformation and now reinvention), it’s a good over-a-glass-of-red discussion to speculate on the leadership that will be necessary to take local government organisations through the next 10 years.

Recently, a number of us local government tragics and leaders did just that and managed to capture our thoughts as discussion starters.